Proactive care team fails to hit the target for referrals

The new proactive model aims to co-ordinate care to keep patients out of hospital COI: 300072
The new proactive model aims to co-ordinate care to keep patients out of hospital COI: 300072
  • Shoreham referrals in ‘not very good’ red zone
  • But the team was one of the last to be set up
  • Status is not an indicator of the care provided

SHOREHAM has been put in a ‘not very good’ red zone in a new care service delivery performance table.

West Sussex County Council’s Health and Adult Social Care select committee heard on Thursday that the number of people being referred to new Proactive Care services in Shoreham was lower than predicted.

The proactive model, a key programme that has been running in the NHS for a couple of years, brings integrated teams together, with each individual’s care co-ordinated by a key worker.

The aim is to improve health and wellbeing services for the frail and elderly, with 22 teams set up across West Sussex. The area from Chichester to Shoreham is governed by Coastal West Sussex CCG and the northern area by Crawley and Horsham and Mid-Sussex CCG.

The committee was shown a colour-coded table during its meeting at County Hall, in Chichester. This showed the number of people being referred to the new teams between April 1, 2014, and February 5, 2015,

Shoreham was the only team in the red zone, with 290 people referred compared to the target of 335. However, it was pointed out this was one of the last Proactive Care teams to be rolled out across West Sussex.

Shoreham team was formed later than in other areas, so it had not had as much time to benefit from the results

Jane Mules, deputy chief operating officer at Sussex Community NHS Trust

Blue meant above target, green on target and amber below target, but the red colour was not given a label. One member deduced it must mean ‘not very good’.

Jane Mules, deputy chief operating officer at Sussex Community NHS Trust, which co-ordinates Proactive Care across Coastal West Sussex, said the Shoreham team was formed later than in other areas, so it had not had as much time to benefit from the results.

Members heard health and care professionals used their experience and a risk stratification tool to identify who should be cared for under the new service.

The aim was to identify patients who could be supported better at home and to manage their illness, so they were less likely to be admitted to hospital.

David Sheldon said more still needed to be done to improve the public’s awareness of the different types of care available.

Ed Cassidy, from NHS Coastal West Sussex CCG, said going forward the teams may need to be expanded, as there was a high demand for proactive care provision in care homes.

He added: “We want to support the care homes and nursing homes. They need more specialist support from our Proactive Care teams.”

The CCG pointed out the red zone was not an indicator of the care provided, only of the numbers being referred.