Jewellery business helps mum who lost necklace with daughter’s ashes

DM1822678a.jpg. Ring made by Ashes in Art, Worthing for woman who lost her daughter's ashes. Danny Spiers of Ashes in Art and Marion Cook holding her ring. Photo by Derek Martin Photography. SUS-180219-123315008
DM1822678a.jpg. Ring made by Ashes in Art, Worthing for woman who lost her daughter's ashes. Danny Spiers of Ashes in Art and Marion Cook holding her ring. Photo by Derek Martin Photography. SUS-180219-123315008

When Marion Cook lost a necklace filled with her daughter’s ashes, she was devastated.

But there was a silver lining in the form of a silver cherish ring, made for her free of charge by a Worthing business.

Laura Newland two weeks before she died aged 30, and right, the lost necklace made from Laura's ashes

Laura Newland two weeks before she died aged 30, and right, the lost necklace made from Laura's ashes

After reading of her plight in the Herald, Danny Spiers from Ashes In Art in High Street, Worthing got in touch with the Portslade grandmother and commissioned a ring made with Laura Newland’s ashes.

It was presented to Marion at their shop on Monday. She said it was ‘beautiful’ and thanked the Ashes In Art team for their generosity. She said: “I feel like Laura is still included in our lives.”

Her daughter passed away in August 2016 aged 30 from blood clots which formed while she was pregnant with her second son Jaxson, now 20 months old.

Marion had a necklace made with her daughter’s ashes, which she wore every day until she first noticed it was missing on November 14.

Her appeal went viral on social media, but no-one came forward to hand it in.

Danny, co-owner of Ashes In Art, was determined to help after hearing her story.

He said: “If we can help restore Marion’s faith in humankind then why not? Nobody should have to go through what she has been through.”

The silver ring took a month to make and the band was made by the company’s jeweller Tara Coomber, whose work is on display at the V&A Museum.

Laura’s ashes were sandwiched between pieces of coloured and clear glass cut from sheets, and the pieces were fused together in a kiln at temperatures of 750°C before being polished and set in the ring.

The message ‘Laura with me forever’ was engraved on the band using a laser-guided machine.

Some of Laura’s ashes will also be planted with an oak tree in Hove Park, Hove on March 26, where she went with her eldest son Callum, nine, to watch steam trains.

Marion said she was also considering buying a glass wall mounting from Ashes in Art for her grandsons. She said: “When they are older, Jaxson will never know his mum, but with all of these memories and photos we have kept it is something for them to hold on to.”