‘Inspirational’ young soldier is mentioned in despatches

Lance Corporal James Brynin in the Helmand province in Afghanistan
Lance Corporal James Brynin in the Helmand province in Afghanistan
  • Former Steyning Grammar School student named in Operational Honours and Awards List
  • Lance Corporal James Brynin was killed in action in October 2013
  • Among 139 members of the armed forces and one civilian honoured for bravery and dedication
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SHOREHAM-born soldier James Brynin, who was killed in action in Afghanistan, has been mentioned in despatches.

The 22-year-old former Steyning Grammar School student was named in the Operational Honours and Awards List, issued by the Ministry of Defence last week.

Lance Corporal Brynin was among 139 members of the armed forces and one civilian to be honoured for bravery and dedication.

The Intelligence Corps soldier was killed when his patrol was attacked in the Helmand province on Tuesday, October 15, 2013.

L/Cpl Brynin was attached to 14th Signal Regiment (Electronic Warfare), deployed to Task Force Helmand in August 2013 as an intelligence analyst working for a light electronic warfare team within the Brigade Reconnaissance Force (BRF) of 7th Armoured Brigade.

Hounds for Heroes was his favourite charity and more than £25,000 was raised through donations after his death. Since then, his family, who now live in Pulborough, have continued to support the charity.

He had such a bright future ahead of him and was generally recognised to be at the top of his peer group

Major Kelly Burman

A spokesman for Hounds for Heroes said: “Another proud moment for the family of Lance Corporal J. Brynin, Intelligence Corps, who has been given an operational award (Mentioned In Despatches) in this year’s honours and awards list.

“May we take this moment to thank everybody who has raised money in his name, the family for their continued support for the charity, and ultimately James for the inspiration he gave to so many.”

Major Kelly Burman described L/Cpl Brynin as one of the Army’s ‘brightest and best’ after he died.

“James had been deliberately selected to form part of the Brigade Reconnaissance Force light electronic warfare team precisely because he was just that – the brightest and best of us,” he said.

“He was a young man who was going places with a great future ahead of him. Despite this being his first posting since leaving intelligence training, he had already been selected for promotion to full corporal, such was his calibre and potential.”

He was an ‘ever-smiling and cheerful young man’ and news of his death had hit the squadron hard.

Major Burman added: “We will remember him as an incredibly brave and selfless comrade.

“When his team came under heavy enemy fire he stepped forward without hesitation to defend them.

“He had such a bright future ahead of him and was generally recognised to be at the top of his peer group.”