Beach is swept clean in litter picking event

DM15115398a.jpg Friends of Shoreham Beach annual Beach Clean. Photo by Derek Martin SUS-150919-225647008
DM15115398a.jpg Friends of Shoreham Beach annual Beach Clean. Photo by Derek Martin SUS-150919-225647008

SHOREHAM residents and others from further afield banded together to scour the beach for litter and record their findings.

As part of the Marine Conservation Society’s Great British Beach Clean, support group Friends of Shoreham Beach (FoSB) and people from as far as West London grabbed their litter pickers and spent two hours on Saturday cleaning up Shoreham Beach.

DM15115413a.jpg Friends of Shoreham Beach annual Beach Clean. Jane Moseley her son Elliott 7. Photo by Derek Martin SUS-150919-225722008

DM15115413a.jpg Friends of Shoreham Beach annual Beach Clean. Jane Moseley her son Elliott 7. Photo by Derek Martin SUS-150919-225722008

Joy Daintree, chairman of FoSB, said: “It was wonderful to see families involved in this beach clean. The children who attended were particularly proud of their efforts and learned to identify organic beach debris from harmful litter with its detrimental effect upon the local wildlife.”

The team managed to remove 40.92kg of litter, which was then collected by a member of Adur Council’s Clean Up teams.

In support of the beach clean, FoSB conducted a detailed survey of the litter found within a section of the beach, 100m to the west of Shingle Road, and covering the width of the beach from house walls to the shore.

Ten volunteers, working in three areas, collected and recorded every item they found and the information will be sent to the Marine Conservation Society’s database for future analysis.

Within this small area, 2.89kg of litter was removed and a brief overview showed that wet wipes and tissues, abandoned plastic bags and sweet wrappers featured highly.

John Charlish, the FoSB beach clean co-ordinator, said: “Almost all of this can be safely said to have been brought to the beach by visiting individuals and despite the obvious bins at every access point, people still seem to think it is okay to throw this stuff away.”